Sydney: author talk featuring James Roy and IBBY Australia AGM

IBBY Australia invites members and interested friends to attend this year’s Annual General Meeting and to hear author

James Roy

winner of the Young People’s History Prize
in the 2016 NSW Premier’s History Awards
speak about One Thousand Hills on
Thursday 27 October 2016
at The Children’s Bookshop, 6 Hannah Street, Beecroft NSW

See the flyer for program and booking details.

 

International Children’s Book Day 2016 featuring Bronwyn Bancroft, Ursula Dubosarsky and Mark McLeod

You’re invited to attend

ONCE UPON A TIME:  A Celebration of 50 Years of IBBY Australia
on INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S BOOK DAY
Saturday 2nd April 2016 | 10 am till 2.30 pm
59 The Boulevarde (cnr Carrington St), Strathfield NSW
Santa Maria del Monte School

Featuring

  • Dr Mark MacLeod addressing the topic IBBY in the Age of Globalisation
  • Bronwyn Bancroft in conversation with Libby Gleeson AM
  • Ursula Dubosarsky in conversation with Dr Robyn Sheahan-Bright

Bronwyn BancroftDubosarsky Ursula C (photo credit Vicki Skarratt 2011)

For full details see the flyer.

Bookings are now open!

Vale Dr Maurice Saxby AM – Children’s Literature Champion

Our thoughts are with the family and friends of Dr Maurice Saxby AM. Our friend Maurie passed away yesterday.  He was a great champion of children’s literature, serving twice on the Hans Christian Andersen Award Jury of The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) and was the first life member of IBBY Australia.  He was the first National President of the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) and remained associated with the CBCA for more than 60 years. He was Patron of the Aora Children’s Literature Research Centre NSW Inc.

Maurie was honoured with many awards in his lifetime including among them Member in the Order of Australia (AM); the Pixie O’Harris award for distinguished service to children’s books by the Children’s Publishing Committee of the Australian Publishers’ Association; a Doctor of Letters from the University of Sydney for his unwavering dedication to Australian children’s literature; life membership of the Primary English Teaching Association Australia for his influence and contribution to the teaching of English in Australia; the Lady Cutler Award for Distinguished Service to Children’s Literature in New South Wales from the CBCA NSW; a Citation and the Nan Chauncy Award from the CBCA and the Dromkeen Medal.

Protected: Members download – launching “My Father’s Islands” by Christobel Mattingley

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Lady Cutler Award honour to Margaret Wild

Picture credit: James Roy

 

The NSW Branch of the Children’s Book Council of Australia honoured children’s author Margaret Wild with the Lady Cutler Award.  The Guide to the Margaret Wild Papers held at the Lu Rees Archive in Canberra gives some indication of the great contribution Margaret has made to children’s literature in Australia.

During the evening the inaugural Dr Maurice Saxby AM honour lecture was announced by Libby Gleeson and Margaret Hamilton, with the first lecture to be held at the State Libraryof NSW during 2012, rather fittingly the National Year of Reading.

 

 

Authors Belinda Murrell and Kate Forsyth shared their family insights into the life and times of Charlotte Barton, their ancestor and the author of A Mother’s Offering to her Children: By a Lady, Long Resident in New South Wales published in 1841, the first children’s book to be published in  Australia.   It seems fitting that on the 170th anniversary of it’s publication the NSW Branch of CBCA have named the Frustrated Writers Award in her memory.

International recognition for Australian Authors

Queensland illustrator Gregory Rogers and Victorian writer Glenda Millard have had publications recognised on the 2012 Honour List for IBBY. The biennial list contains the most highly regarded titles of the previous two years as selected by participating IBBY countries. Rogers and Millard join previous Honour Book awardees, such as Julie Vivas, Nadia Wheatley, Allan Baillie, Margaret Wild and Jeannie Baker all of whom have received significant international recognition for Australian children’s literature. The wordless picture book, The Hero of Little Street, is the third in a series by Gregory Rogers that features a boy and characters such a medieval baron, Shakespeare and a bear. In this latest story, the boy finds himself in the Delft of the Dutch Old Masters after a chase through Trafalgar Square and the National Gallery. Many references to famous paintings are scattered throughout the pages as the boy and an escapee dog have multiple and often hilarious adventures. No words are required as the reader pores over the masterful watercolour and pen-and-ink drawings to join in the visual jokes. The Hero of Little Street was the Children’s Book Council of Australia Picture Book of the Year in 2010. The IBBY listing will bring Rogers’ work to the attention of an international audience.

A dystopian, but very recognisable, Melbourne is the setting for Glenda Millard’s A Small Free Kiss in the Dark. War has come suddenly and unexpectedly to the city leaving a disparate group stranded in the State Library, including the narrator, street kid Skip. Billy, an older homeless man, young Max, whose mother has not returned and Skip make a hazardous journey to Luna Park where they find shaky refuge. There they meet up with Tia and her very young baby. Millard challenges readers with notions of family, and although the subject matter is grim, her storytelling is both powerful and hopeful and is conveyed through lyrical prose. A Small Free Kiss in the Dark has been recognised by the US Branch of IBBY on a list of significant foreign titles, was an Honour Book in the 2010 CBCA Awards and won its category in the 2010 Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards. Both titles are published by Allen & Unwin. Writers and illustrators from more than 60 countries will be recognised on the 2012 IBBY Honour List.

Patricia Wrightson

A recent event of great impact on IBBY Australia was the death of Patricia Wrightson on 15th March. While her passing has been deservedly noticed in the general press and within the literary community, it is significant for us as she was the recipient in 1986 of the Hans Christian Andersen medal. This is awarded every two years by IBBY and judged on the writer’s entire output by a jury of international experts. Only two Australians have ever been honoured in this way, Patricia for writing and Robert Ingpen for illustration. Patricia Wrightson contributed greatly to the development of children’s literature in Australia, as she pioneered the integration of characters and stories from indigenous tradition into novels for contemporary readers. Her Nargun and the Stars became a favourite for many, and the Wirrun trilogy is a major achievement.